Maran's

   

Wyandotte's

   

Welsummer's

   Large fowl ( heavy )

Maran's were originally developed in  France in the 1920's and were introduced into the UK in the late 1920s. The French Maran have lightly feathered legs and the English variety do not. They are available in many different colours and are probably  best known for laying dark chocolate brown eggs. Maran's are a busy bird and a great forager in free range conditions, also making good mothers. They will easily lay well in excess of 220 eggs in the first year.

 

  Large fowl ( heavy )

Wyandottes are an American breed developed in the 1880's and named after a native American tribe. The silver laced was the first variety and now there are many colours. They are a very hardy bird having a rose comb and will take extreme temperatures  in their stride. They are a calm friendly bird and will live happily in relative confinement, they also make excellent mothers. Expect more than 200  cream coloured eggs in the first year.

 

Large fowl ( light )

Welsummers were developed in Holland in the late 1920's and come in just a couple of colours. The cockerel has the traditional farmyard look. They are an inquisitive bird and are a very economic eater, being great foragers when given plenty of room. Welsummers will rarely go broody, so if you want to hatch eggs you will need an incubator or a surrogate mother. Egg numbers should be well over 220 in the first year and are usually terracotta in colour.

 

Orpington's

 

 Leghorn's

   

Niederrheiner

  Large fowl ( heavy )

Orpington,s  were created in England in the 1880's. Black were the first variety, and now there are several colours available. They have have a profusion of feathers making them look larger than they really are. Being extremely docile they make a great family bird, and will thrive in relative confinement and also make great mothers. Just under 200 cream coloured eggs should be expected in the first year.

 

 Large fowl ( light )

Leghorn's originate from Italy but it was in America where they were extensively developed in the late 1830's, they reached Britain in the 1870's. Their appearance is dominated by a large single comb and are available in many colours. Leghorn's can be excitable and will rarely go broody.  Being a prolific layer they have been crucial in the development of many modern hybrids. Expect 250 or more white eggs in their first year's laying.

 

Large fowl ( heavy )

Niederrheiner as the name suggests, originate form the lower Rhine region of Germany. They were developed in the late 1930's as a dual purpose breed and come in several colours. Having a calm and docile nature they are an ideal bird for the novice keeper and should produce at least 200 cream colouerd eggs in their first year. Still quite rare in Britain but after being featured in Practial Poultry magazine are becoming more and more popular.

 

             
         

 

             
         

 

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